Friday, 22 April 2016

Five on Shakespeare

Hello, thank you for calling in.  Today I am joining in with Amy at Love Made My Home for Five on Friday, so thank you, Amy, for organising the party and joining us all together.  You are a star.

So, today is 23rd April, England's national day.  To be honest, I find it difficult to get excited about St George.  There, I've said it.  Unpatriotic of me, I know, but I just don't feel any connexion with him.  St David and St Patrick, boys from the British Isles whose feet trod our landscape, yes; a knight from the Middle East who never came within a thousand miles of England and was randomly adopted as our patron saint by a king who spent most of his life in France and barely spoke English?  No.  William Shakespeare, a great Englishman who left a gift for the world, saves the day: 23rd April was the day he died and today is the 400th anniversary of that day.
 
The Best Beloved took this photo in Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon, in 2008.
 
All British children study Shakespeare's plays at school and there are very good reasons for that.  For a start, many familiar phrases originated in his work: green-eyed monster, eaten out of house and home, a foregone conclusion, brave new world... thank you, Will Shakespeare.  Secondly, the themes are universal and as relevant now as they were in the sixteenth century: both Cole Porter's Kiss Me Kate and 10 Things I Hate About You are The Taming of the Shrew, West Side Story is Romeo and Juliet, Forbidden Planet is The Tempest and The Lion King is Hamlet with a happy ending (after all, it is Disney).  The problem for modern children is the language, removed as it is from the English we read and speak today. 

When I was a teenager I was fortunate to live within an hour's drive of the West End of London which meant that there were plenty of opportunities to see the Bard's work performed which, of course, is the key to engaging with Shakespeare: he wrote plays to be performed by actors who understood the meaning of his words and were trained to convey that meaning to the audience, not texts to be read by bewildered first-formers.  My teachers understood that and so off we went to the theatre whenever we could to see those texts come alive.  So today my Five celebrates five of those plays, memories illustrated by the programmes I have kept.

1. The Merchant of Venice


This was the first Shakespeare play I studied and the first I saw on the stage, in this case at the Young Vic.  On the back I have written "School English Trip 15th November 1979" so I was fourteen years old.  Modern setting, Shakespeare's words, no problem.  This one was directed by Michael Attenborough.

2. Othello


Ah, now this one really was something special: Othello at the National Theatre with Paul Scofield and Felicity Kendal, directed by  Sir Peter Hall.  Michael Bryant was a spellbinding Iago.  The programme cost 40p and I have written "School Trip 1st March 1981" on the back, very handy as I sat my O-Levels three months later and this was a set text.

3.  The Taming of The Shrew


On summer evenings all over England you can find hardy souls wrapped in blankets and cagoules, enjoying picnics and watching Shakespeare performed in the open air.  It's a wonderful tradition!  In fact, the first Shakespeare play we took The Mathematician to see was The Tempest, performed in the open air and preceded by...a tempest!  The redoubtable players said that as long as there was an audience, they would perform.  Marvellous!  On 9th June 1982 I was at the Open Air Theatre at Regent's Park in its Golden Jubilee Season watching The Taming of the Shrew. Kate O'Mara was a wonderful and memorable Katherine (although, sssh!, I must say that I really don't like the misogynist theme of this play, despite the fact that I have seen it at least four times!).

4. As You Like It


This was an amateur production - I'm not fussy, as long as it's good I really don't mind if the company is paid or unpaid.  The Chapter Garden of Windsor Castle made a leafy and lovely Forest of Arden and I knew several of the actors including the absolutely wonderful David Thomas, the deputy headteacher at my school, teacher of history, architecture, mathematics and history of art, ardent monarchist, director of ambitious school plays and leader of school trips to Italy, who played Touchstone and produced and designed this performance.  On the back I have written that this was Thursday 23rd July 1981 and that I went with Mum, Dad and my sister. 

5.  Much Ado About Nothing
 
 
I studied Much Ado About Nothing for A-Level English and in this case, familiarity has certainly not bred contempt (I think that's Aesop rather than Shakespeare) for it's my favourite Shakespeare play.  I have seen it five times and this was not only the best of those, it is quite simply the best play I have ever seen.  It was outstanding.  I remember it so well, Sinead Cusack and Derek Jacobi sparkling as Beatrice and Benedick, the mirrored floor of the stage at the newly-opened Barbican Centre, the dancing, the torches... I was wonderfully transported to another world and I still hold the pictures in my head.  To my great annoyance, I haven't written the date on the back but this cast list shows that The Taming of the Shrew and King Lear were also being performed that season and as I went to those too, and did write the dates on the backs, I know that it must have been the spring of 1983.
 
Oh, how I have enjoyed going through my theatre programmes, remembering nights out with friends, with family, with boyfriends and later, with The Best Beloved and our children.  I have known for months that I wanted to commemorate Shakespeare today but I didn't know how I wanted to do that until my last post, when I suddenly realised the way for me to raise my personal metaphorical toast to the great Bard was to share these early experiences with you in this way.  Thank you for indulging me.  Now if you have time, please hop over to Rosie's blog because she is celebrating the day in the same way - except that it's different, because we have seen different productions and she has an absolute WOWSER at number five.  I was a bit stunned when I read her blog yesterday and saw that we were thinking along the same lines, but that's what Shakespeare's about, I think, the universal experience.
 
Today I am off to the Wenlock Poetry Festival for the day to enjoy some contemporary poetry, but I'm sure there will be a nod to Shakespeare.  We can't really get away from him.
So farewell, the elements be kind to thee and make thy spirits all of comfort (Antony and Cleopatra).
 
See you soon.
 
Love, Mrs Tiggywinkle x

31 comments:

  1. To see it live is the only way or at least a good movie of it. To just read it loses much of the impact.
    My favorite are the histories.

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    1. I agree, Janet, although today I discovered that a friend of mine loves to read them rather than watch them! I not so familiar with the histories, it's something I think I must rectify. I hope you've had a good weekend. x

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  2. How fortunate to be able to see the plays while studying the great Bard! What lovely memories for you! I was fortunate to have an English teacher that taught us while bringing us to a play in Boston for an educational field trip (Orthello). Romeo and Juliet was a film at that time, also, and it all seemed so romantic to me as a young girl. I would have loved seeing all the plays you attended. How wonderful for you, and so nice that you have all the playbills. xx Karen

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    1. I know, Karen, and I don't think I realised at the time just how fortunate I was. Was that the Zeffirelli film, with gorgeous music by Nino Rota? Beautiful. Hope you've had a good weekend. x

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  3. I can still recite from memory long parts of The Merchant of Venice - the odd things that stay stored in memory....
    I am trying to imagine Shakespeare in the leafy green of the Chapter Garden - how beautiful!

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    1. It really was beautiful. I saw A Midsummer Night's Dream in the Chapter Garden the previous year and it was perfect. Twice blessed, like the quality of mercy! Hope you've had a good weekend. x

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  4. A great post, it is so obvious from your writing that you have a real love of Shakespeare. I have visited Stratford his birthplace many times as that is where my mothers late parents lived.

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    1. Thank you. I love Stratford, I've been a few times, notably on our honeymoon. Hope you've had a good weekend. x

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  5. A lovely post. I remember watching Much ado about nothing in a manor garden one hot summers evening. Blissful. B x

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    1. Thanks Barbara. I think I may have forgotten what hot summers evenings are like! Hope you have travelled safely. x

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  6. Well you know that I have loved reading this post, isn't it wonderful to have all these great and precious memories? 'Much Ado' is one of my favourites and I can imagine what a wonderful night you would have had at the Barbican. Thank you for linking to my post, I'm going to edit it now and put in a link to yours. Enjoy the poetry festival:)

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    1. Thanks Rosie, you are kind. The poetry festival was fantastic but tiring. I have my mother to thank for my habit of buying programmes, writing the date on them and keeping them - hers go back to the 1950s. I am so glad, they really are wonderful to look through. As are yours, too. Great minds think alike! x

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  7. Lovely, lovely, a great celebration. We saw the Merchant of Venice at the Globe which was a great experience. Have a good time x

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    1. Ooh, The Globe! I haven't been but that must have been special. Thank you. x

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  8. I visited Rosie's blog and she mentioned your post, so I came for a visit. These all sound like wonderful productions and there really is no better way to experience Shakespeare than to see his plays performed.

    As for Mrs Tiggywinkle - I share your love of Beatrix Potter and she has always been my favourite character.

    Hope you are enjoying a weekend of poetry and Shakespeare celebrations.

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    1. It's lovely to meet you, especially as you are a fan of Miss Potter and my lovely hedgehog alter ego! I have had a lovely but tiring weekend, full of poetry and The Bard, thank you. x

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  9. Oh my, I'm so pleased to have found your blog. What a lovely post.

    I enjoyed the tidbits of info about Shakespeare and your selection of plays you've enjoyed. My hubby and I were able to watch a Shakespeare play performed in the open air one warm summer evening some years ago. It was divine... everyone sitting on the grass together listening for those familiar lines and phrases that we all love to keep handy for appropriate reciting, all laughing in the right places.

    Thank you for a lovely visit. Wishing you a wonderful weekend...Brenda

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  10. PS. Love your blog header, and I'm a Beatrix Potter fan, especially of Mrs. Tiggywinkle. B xox

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    1. Thank you for your generous comments, Brenda, it's lovely to meet you and I am, of course, always delighted to meet another fan of Miss Potter! The Best Beloved took the photo I use on my blog header, it's our local park, less than two miles away. Hope you've had a good weekend.x

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  11. I loved reading your blog Mrs T, did you watch Shakespeare live on TV last night?

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    1. Oh Thank You, Lis. I didn't watch last night's programme as I was out in Much Wenlock but I have recorded it so that I can catch up. There was quite a buzz about it this morning so I am really looking forward to it. x

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  12. I loved reading your blog Mrs T, did you watch Shakespeare live on TV last night?

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  13. Wonderful to read your remembrances of the different plays. It is amazing to think that works written so long ago are still being performed today isn't it. Thank you for joining Five On Friday, I hope that you had a great weekend! xx

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    1. Thank you Amy. Yes, it is wonderful, but he was a very special writer who had a wonderful talent. Thank YOU for organising Five On Friday. xx

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  14. Lucky you. Thanks for sharing all of these wonderful memories.

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    1. I really do feel lucky. It's certainly not so easy to see Shakespeare in Shropshire. x

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  15. Well this was an absolutely wonderful post! I enjoyed seeing your programs from past performances and imagining what it would be like to have that opportunity. It is just great. And there is nothing like live performance. I laughed at your contrasting skilled actors' performances with kids reading Shakespeare and trying to figure it out. So true.

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    1. Thank you, I am glad you enjoyed it. x

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  16. What a wonderful post. I'm a huge fan of Shakespeare although I'm not familiar with many of his plays. But you're right, good actors really bring it alive. And there are so many wonderful quotes. Something for every occasion I think.

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  17. Thanks CJ. I agree with you, definitely something for every occasion. x

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