Saturday, 2 September 2017

Would You Like An Antler?

Hello, thank you for calling in, it's lovely to see you.  The sun is shining today and I am watching a butterfly flutter by outside the window. 

I was chatting with a friend in a rose garden over a pot of tea and a Shrewsbury cake, a good friend whom I have known for more than twenty-five years, a friend who shares my love of the countryside, the seaside and nature's treasures.  We were laughing about my shell collection (larger than it should be) and my fossil collection (much smaller than I would like it to be) when she said, "Would you like an antler?  I've got three but I've really only got room for two."  That's not something you hear every day and I burst out laughing.
 
My friend explained that while she was running a Wildlife Watch group several years ago, she took the group to visit a deer park and they were given a guided tour by a ranger.  They found some antlers lying on the ground and my friend brought them home.  Gentle reader, I can reassure you that no animal was harmed in the acquisition of these antlers: they are shed by the deer every year and new ones grow in their place.

 

So, here is an antler from a fallow deer.  It's rather beautiful, I think, and very tactile, and much as I would like to keep it, I really don't have anywhere sensible to put it, so it's going to a very good home - The Teacher is taking it to school and giving it to "the man who looks after the fossils and skulls" so that it can be used by any teacher in the school to help the children learn about deer, antlers,  life cycles, conservation, beauty, awe and wonder, those sorts of things.
 
See you soon.
 
Love, Mrs Tiggywinkle x

18 comments:

  1. What a lovely use for the antler :). I can imagine you in the rose garden having a good natter, nothing like it! B x

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    1. It was an absolute treat, Barbara, and we put the world to rights while we were at it. x

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  2. Fancy that! I'm surprised you haven't got it on the wall over your fireplace. x

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    1. I was SO tempted, Karen! It's a beautiful thing, but my house is simply too small. x

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  3. What a great place for it, a resource for education. I am now going to google shrewsbury cake, I don't think I have ever come across one.

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    1. I'm not sure my Shrewsbury cake was the best so I am thinking of having a go myself. It's more of a biscuit than a cake and mine could have done with a bit longer in the oven, but I'd never had one before so I had to try it. x

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  4. Sounds like the antler has found a very good and useful home.

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    1. It has, Tammy, but I was loathe to let it go. x

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  5. I love the image of the rose garden and tea and cake. Had to smile at the antler as we have some left in the garage, collected to make replicas of ancient tools, we used to have a bucket or two of flint for knapping too (Husband's hobby I hasten to add) Glad the antler found a good and useful home:)

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    1. I'm so glad it's not just me, Rosie. I really would like to have kept it but the thought of it doing some good at school pleases me greatly. x

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  6. Well, you're better than me. I could not have parted with the antler. One day I hope to find a moose antler just lying there in the woods for me to bring home, but they are rather large and unweildy, so my husband would say very firmly "no."
    It's very generous of you & best beloved to add it to the school collection for all to enjoy :)
    Wendy

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    1. I really REALLY wanted to keep it Wendy, it was so beautiful, but my home is very small and my husband did say, very firmly, "No!" The thought of children learning to respect and care about deer from it does warm my heart, though. x

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  7. It is nice to know that no deer were harmed in the acquisition of the antlers. It made me think of those hunting lodges where some less fortunate deer end up as trophies mounted on the walls - sadly, an all too common sight here in Canada. It is a great idea to give it to the school and help to educate children about the importance of wildlife conservation. Marie x

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    1. I am glad you approve, Marie. I did think about hunting trophies when, for a brief moment, I pictured the antler on the wall in my house and perhaps that unhappy thought made it easier for me to give it away. I was sorely tempted to keep it though, it's so beautiful. x

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  8. I laughed about your unconventional conversation :) but I am glad the antler is going to a good educational place! xx Karen

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  9. Hello, I've just happened on your blog via... can't remember (someone else's) and really like it! I'm a granny from Edinburgh. The other day I was digging in my garden (where we've lived for 28 years), thought I'd hit a root and dug up... an antler. Very odd! I'll be back.

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    1. Hi Pam, it's lovely to meet you and you're welcome back here anytime! I've just hopped over to your blog for a peep - it looks like you had typical west windy weather on Arran, thank goodness you had the sunshine on the Saturday. Take care. x

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